Representation of New Media in Cinematographic Apparatuses: Critical Analysis of “The Social Network” as One of the Social Media Themed Hollywood Movies

Tutku Akter 1 *
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1 Eastern Mediterranean University, TRNC
* Corresponding Author
Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, Volume 6, Issue December 2016 - Special Issue, pp. 149-164. https://doi.org/10.30935/ojcmt/5647
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ABSTRACT

As new and old media articulate with each other, it is possible to find traces of each media in the other one. Although new media is fed from old media by re-telecasting [rebroadcasting] what has been telecasted [broadcasted] in old media, old media subject new media in to its various programs or products. As it is known, cinema, which can be considered as old media and as an ideological state apparatus, is one of the influential medium in the process of naturalizing and normalizing ‘dominant’ as dominant. Because of this, representation of new media in old media is explored to understand how the dominant power relations or old mainstream media represent or portray new mainstream or new (?) dominant power relations. During the present study, “unchanging political economic structures in the field of media industry” and the way they legitimate and naturalize their superiority is the main argument that has been taken for granted. For the purpose of the present study, the motion-picture “The Social Network” is analyzed in terms of investigating how the messages were coded and how the reality of Facebook as a new product of dominant power relations was constructed.

CITATION

Akter, T. (2016). Representation of New Media in Cinematographic Apparatuses: Critical Analysis of “The Social Network” as One of the Social Media Themed Hollywood Movies. Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, 6(December 2016 - Special Issue), 149-164. https://doi.org/10.30935/ojcmt/5647

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