Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies

Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage
AMA 10th edition
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Brewer SW. Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage. Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies. 2018;8(4), 345-361. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956
APA 6th edition
In-text citation: (Brewer, 2018)
Reference: Brewer, S. W. (2018). Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage. Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, 8(4), 345-361. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956
Chicago
In-text citation: (Brewer, 2018)
Reference: Brewer, Steven W. "Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage". Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies 2018 8 no. 4 (2018): 345-361. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956
Harvard
In-text citation: (Brewer, 2018)
Reference: Brewer, S. W. (2018). Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage. Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, 8(4), pp. 345-361. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956
MLA
In-text citation: (Brewer, 2018)
Reference: Brewer, Steven W "Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage". Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies, vol. 8, no. 4, 2018, pp. 345-361. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956
Vancouver
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Brewer SW. Come for a Job, Stay for the Socializing: Gratifications Received from LinkedIn Usage. Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies. 2018;8(4):345-61. https://doi.org/10.12973/ojcmt/3956

Abstract

LinkedIn is the leading social network site focusing on professional life, with over 500 million customers, but has received far less research attention than Facebook and other personal networks. This study is one of the first to examine gratifications received from using LinkedIn by U.S. adults and relationships between those gratifications and how the site is utilized. Uses and Gratifications Theory served as conceptual framework. The cross-sectional study surveyed 390 active LinkedIn customers 25 and older about gratifications received, intensity of attitudes, and site usage. Exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to identify three gratification factors for using LinkedIn: jobs and job affairs, social aspects of employment, and finding old and new friends easily. The social aspects of employment factor had a significant relationship with both intensity of attitudes toward LinkedIn and site usage. This was a surprising finding, since LinkedIn is commonly associated only with utilitarian career-oriented motives, rather than hedonic gratifications like socializing.

References

License

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.